Townhouse Books

Thursday, May 31, 2007

Percy Jackson and the Olympians: series by Rick Riordan

As a summer of Harry Potter excitement approaches with the final book and fifth movie, I realized that I'd only read the Order of the Phoenix once and that I didn't remember much from it except how put off I was by Harry's 15-year-old anger/angst. I think I'd ended up skimming an unfair amount of it. So, not too long ago, I picked up the fifth book again and read it, obsessively. I finished it a few mornings later when I should have been packing for a flight to see my folks for a short weekend trip. I couldn't help but bring the sixth book to read on the plane even though it weighed more than the clothes I brought.

How happy was I then, upon my return, when my husband handed me a book called The Lightning Thief, book 1 of a series called "Percy Jackson and the Olympians."

Percy Jackson is a 12-year-old boy when we first meet him of uncertain parentage -- he never met his father. Strange things happen to Percy too often and he's constantly being kicked out of school. After his math teacher sprouts leathery wings and tries to kill him, Percy is off on an adventure where he find out who is father is, finds out he's not alone in the world, and, of course, is sent on a difficult quest on which balances the fate of humankind.

Seamlessly I read the second one immediately after, The Sea of Monsters, and we are now awaiting the arrival of the third one from Amazon.

If you're in the mood for some young fantasy lit, this is perfect! Enjoy!


Right before HP, I finished "Rabbit at Rest" and the Rabbit series by John Updike. It's over. It was brilliant (though I still disliked that second book).


Enter your zip code to find this in your local library:

Labels:


Search Worldcat

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

French Women Don't Get Fat: The Secret of Eating for Pleasure: Mireille Guiliano

This book is so funny and weird and chatty and oblivious that I would recommend it to almost anyone. The author is French, but has lived in America for most of her adult life. She is the CEO of Veuve Clicquot, and her life is one big dinner party with plenty of champagne.
From this lofty vantage point, she is able to point out everything that is wrong with American eating habits. She's mostly right, but she skates right along the edge of obnoxious throughout the book. And yet it's a fun read! She recognizes and pokes fun of the American desire for a bullet-point list telling them exactly what to do, and instead provides a hopping, skipping memoir of a life well lved, with recipes.
It makes an interesting counterpoint to my collection of "depression lit" memoirs, and based on Mireille's advice I have begun drinking a citron presse (lemon water) every morning before I start in on the coffee.


Enter your zip code to find this in your local library:

Labels:


Search Worldcat